Show me your data sets!

Are authors of a scientific publication really more unwilling to share their raw data when their reported evidence is not too strong? This question was recently addressed in the subject of psychology, unsurprisingly published in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. Jelte Wicherts, Marjan Bakker and Dylan Molenaar from the Psychology Department of the University of Amsterdam, indeed came to that conclusion. Their study included 1149 results from 49 papers. It is interesting that in 28 of the considered 49 papers, the respective co-authors did not share their research data, even if they had agreed on that before.

Distribution of reporting errors per paper for papers from which data were shared and from which no data were shared. From DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0026828

Distribution of reporting errors per paper for papers from which data were shared and from which no data were shared. From DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0026828

However, one might argue that the authors of this interesting “meta”-study walk on a difficult terrain, as they are trying to draw a correlation about the accuracy of other scientists’ correlations. But I think, their paper makes it clear enough that they were very much aware of that issue.

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