Discussion? Unwanted.

The dealings with research  results within the scientific community seems to become an ongoing topic in the german newspaper Die Zeit. In their online version, a case about a psychologic study is reported that might be described with words like “concealment“, “withholding“ or “suppression“. Here is what happened, as described in the article:

Frieder Lang from the University Erlangen-Nürnberg reported in March 2013 his research (please mind the paywall), which might be summarized with the insight that pessimistic people have a longer life than optimistic people. This is discussed with that pessimistic people apparently are more concerned about their health. This study, however, is questioned in some aspects by the statisticians Björn und Sören Christensen from the University of Applied Sciences and the University of Kiel. Their main concern addresses the assignment of test subjects into optimistic and pessimistic individuals. As they argue, the characteristic of an individual might change over the course of the five-years study. In my opinion, this concern does not contradict the research, but in fact gives a significant contribution.

The Zeit article reports that the Christensen brothers sent a note with their analysis in May 2013 to the journal Psychology and Aging in which the original research was published. Their note was refused for publishing, because it did not include a theoretical background between the test subjects’ felt and actual healthiness. One might argue here that delivering this background is covered by the originally addressed paper from Lang and coworkers. After this fruitless attempt to publish their concerns, that note was submitted as a paper to the Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie (Journal of Health Psychology). More than half a year later, they received again a refusal with an astonishing explanation: It was not possible to find a single referee willing to review that paper. After waiting for another half year, the manuscript was withdrawn by the authors.

In the public, science is often seen as a process of learning and exchange. Theories and conclusions can be discussed, complemented, or even overthrown. Nevertheless, the peer-review publishing system appears to be more static than a fluent research process might require. Tools like PubPeer and the review option in ResearchGate do exist and are of growing importance. But, nonetheless, they are still watched suspiciously by the established journals.

As Sören Christensen explained to me, their paper is currently under revision. So the case is not closed yet.

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