The importance of feeling stupid

I recently read a text about the concept behind a scientific publication, stating that it is somewhat misleading when it comes to the description of the scientific process. True enough, most papers are built upon a theory that is supposed to be tested, followed by a respective experimental setup in order to prove that theory. Nevertheless, this is indeed not how science usually works. The most important breakthroughs are coming from sidetracks, unexpected observations, or even from miscarried experiments.

I have to agree that the process of deduction cannot produce any information that has not been there before. Accessing and combining given information is clearly an important factor in science, but I think that it is difficult to conclude previously unknown concepts, or question the established ones only by deduction. But this is, however, what the structure of most scientific articles pretends: The team of scientists has an enlightenment about a given theory and deducts a meaningful experiment to prove or disprove exactly defined aspects of that theory. The data is then collected and listed without any subjective interpretation at this point of time. Finally, when all this is done, for the first time the scientists look at their new data in context of the theory to prove and come to new, ground-breaking conclusions about nature. I would be interested, how many of those publications originate from an experiment that was supposed to give a completely different result and let the researchers being puzzled for considerable time.

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In this essay, „The importance of stupidity in scientific research“, Martin Schwartz arises the conflict between the consideration of scientists as smart people, while many scientists themselves instead feel stupid in their work. Scientists are indeed addressing problems that not so many people have addressed before – which is the reason why they do it. So clearly, there is a lack of certainity, and every step has to be done carefully. It happens so easily that something gets overlooked, misinterpreted, or overrated. In science, you don’t simply know.

If you realize that you don’t know too much about certain things, and these things happen to be your scientific project, you must feel quite stupid. And again, this is why we do science: because we don’t know things.

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